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Activity 1 for Activities
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Word Problem Whizzes
Posted: March 29, 2010
Customer avatarBy:Lani Joanne Tachera
From:West Hills
Estimated Time20-40 minutes
Description:

Purpose: Teach children to do multi-step math word problems. Teacher creates multi-step word problems with boxes (numbered step one, two, three and so on) showing where math work is shown or done. You may combine addition and subtraction or multiplication and division in one problem, depending on grade level.
Divide children into teams of no more than four children per team. Give each team a small erasible white board with white board marker and to the recorder a clip board, a pencil, and a 4 x 6 inch Post-it® pad attached. The children are to work the problem out on the white boards and place number sentence and answer (along with the box numbe in the corner). All recorders show answers when timer sounds. Give a team point for each correct answer and a cooperation point when they work together as a team to solve cooperatively. This way you will encourage that they work together tosolve problems collaboratively and cooperatively.
Show math problem on overhead or projector. Then time the children (three to five minutes) using a timer. Children work together as a team to solve problem on white board. Then recorder on each team records answers for each box. When timer goes off, children turn erasible board over and recorder holds post its pads on clip board up for teacher view and scoring.
At the end of 40 to 45 minutes, game ends and team with most total points wins. This game is adaptable to several grade levels, depending on the word problem used.
Example:
Grade 1 -- Word problem. Sam had five orange fish and three black fish. How many fish did Sam own? (Box One answer. Use a number sentence.) He gave away two fish to his best friend Paul. How many fish Sam have at the end? (Box Two answer. Use a number sentence.)
Grade 2 -- Alexis had $1.25. Her mother gave her $1.45 for raking the yard and sweeping the sidewalk. How much does she have now? (Use Box One to answer. Use a number sentence.) She bought a popcorn for 75 cents. How much money does she have left? (Use Box Two to show your answer. Use a number sentence.)
Grade 3 -- Ben and Tricia made and baked three batches of cookies with 18 cookies in each batch. How many cookies did they bake all together? (Use Box One to show answer. Use a number sentence.) They then equally shared (or divided) all their cookies with their friends Melissa and Ethan. How many cookies did each child (Ben, Tricia, Melissa, EThan) get as a result? (Use Box Two to show answer in a number sentence.)
Grade 4 -- Four oranges were to be shared equally by eight children (Isaac, Juliet, Jolene, Andrew, Mercedes, Richard, Nicole, and Owen). How were the oranges cut up. (Show answer in Box one with a number sentence.) Juliet went outside and saw her friend Madison so she cut her piece again so the two friends could share equally. How much of an orange did Juliet and Madison each get? (Show answer in a number sentence.)
This can be adapted to each grade level on up through 8th grade. With the higher grades, I would put three children at most on one team.
Prizes: I award little prizes of erasers or pencils to the team with the most overall team points and cooperation points. Tie points results in both teams winning the prizes.
How it Works
Step 11. Teacher prepares about twenty math word problems for Word Problem Whizzes Game.

2. Teacher assembles all necessary materials.

3. Teacher explains rules to students in class and prizes. Emphasize the importance of cooperation points -- these points could make your team the winner.
Step 24. Explain rules to students and ask them to repeat rules back to you. A good way to divide teams up is having each child's name on a tongue depressor and then dividing teams by pulling sticks. Children should be assigned to tables to work in teams.

5. Pass out all materials needed to do the game. Explain again, if needed.
Step 36. Play game, making sure that everyone knows his/her role and importance of cooperation.

7. Teacher tallies points as game progresses. Teacher also makes a determination (based on observations( whether team deserve.
Step 410. At the end of 40 to 45 minutes, award prizes to team with most overall points.
1st Grade, 2nd Grade, 3rd Grade, 4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade, 7th Grade, 8th Grade, ESL
Classroom Management, Language Arts, Math, Special Education
Cluster Mapping, Questioning Strategy
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Activity 2 for Activities
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Laboratory Graphing
Posted: January 24, 2010
Customer avatarBy:Rochelle
Estimated Time60+ minutes
Description:

To be used for any collection of numbers (polls, laboratory results, frequency, etc...) I had my students do an inquiry-based activity/laboratory "How Many Drops of Water Fit on a Penny". To do this, they were given only a simple task, "to use a dropper and water to see how many drops of water will fit on the surface of the penny before it spills over". From there, students were asked to log their number of drops. Students shared their results and we put on data table and calculated the range, mean, median and mode using all compiled student data. Students were also asked to place their number of drops on a yellow Post-it® Note and place it on a number line that was displayed on the wall in class (10-150 with 10 unit increments). We then had a discussion on why the range of numbers were so large and brainstormed ideas on how this range could be adjusted (to be made smaller) NOTE: to lessen the number of variables (size of drop, height of water, pressure on bulb, age of penny, location of drop etc...). The number line with Post-it Notes not only gave a students a visual of the range of data but confirmed the calculations of mean, median, and mode with the use of the Post-it Notes. (Note: students were asked to stack Post-it Notes if there was more than one of the same data point on the number line. In other words, if 15 appeared 3 times, there were 3 Post-it Notes stacked one on top of another). This process visually and most obviously pointed out the mode as well as made it clear how median could be viewed readily. After two more trials of getting rid of variables and becoming more consistent with laboratory procedures, students were asked to put the class averages for trial 2 this time on a blue Post-it Note, and trial 3 on a bright pink Post-it Note. Each time as the Post-it Notes were placed on the number line, they were to cover any Post-it Note that was there before the next trial. This made it clear to see how results were becoming more consistent and the range becoming closer. It also showed that with trial 3 (bright pink), the Post-it Notes were now stacked higher and closer together (mode and mean) on a number line. After each student placed their 3 colored Post-it Notes on the number and after wrap up discussion, it was also noted and discussed with students that if the number line were rotated from a horizontal position to a vertical position, it became a bar graph. The Post-it Notes really served as a visual aid to help students understand the concepts of not only mean, median, mode, range and bar graph but it also helped in the process for students to set a "goal" in decreasing the range by focusing on decreasing variables in an experiment. It made what could be a confusing concept (filled with calculations and numbers) into a visual, fun, easier to understand activity...not to mention students LOVE getting out of their seats!!
How it Works
Step 1Using an eye dropper and a cup of water, find out how many drops of water fit on the surface of a penny without it spilling over. You will have 2 practices before "counting" the next set of data. NOTE: after each trial, wipe your penny dry.
Step 2Each student shares result with class as teacher posts data on data table by student number.
Step 3Students calculated range, mean, median and mode from results and are asked to put THEIR data number from trial 1 on a yellow Post-it Note and place it on the number line displayed on the class wall. NOTE: Post-it Notes to be stacked one over (not covering) the other if there is more than one data point.
Step 4Class discussion on trial 1 in regards to range and how it can be made \"smaller"\ (note: by decreasing variables such as height of drop, pressure on dropper, side of penny, age of penny etc..). Students agree on turning 1 variable into a constant, thus making trial 2 more consistent as far as procedures, in the hope of decreasing the range.
Step 5After Trial 2, students again share data, discuss range, put individual data on blue Post-it Note this time, post on number line, and again discuss further variables and come up with yet another one to remain constant (now 2 variables become 2 constants). Repeat for trial 3, however, data is now displayed on bright pink Post-it Notes.
Step 6All 3 colored Post-it Notes now displayed on number line (yellow=trial 1, blue=trial 2, bright pink=trial 3). Wrap up discussion on change in range as variables are eliminated and procedures become more consistent amongst participants. Mean, median and mode can also be visually confirmed with the number line Post-it Note data and also shows students how "easy" mean, median, mode can be when numbers are simple grouped. Students were also made aware that if a number line such as this is rotated from a horizontal to a vertical position, it can also serve as a bar graph.
Educational GoalVariables vs. Constants (how it affects data)
Graphing
Mean,median,mode, range
Supporting All LearnersVisual
Kinesthetic
Critical Thinking
Hands-on

**turning what could be a difficult concept (calculating tons of numbers to find mean, median,mode, range) into a visual, hands-
Lesson ExtensionsGiven more time, what do you think would happen if we continued to omit more variables? Did more trials?
AssignmentToo many variables = inconsistent data collection
Increasing trials = more consistent results
Being specific
Brainstorming ways to improve the activity and
its results.
7th Grade
Science
beginning-middle-end-organizer, Cluster Mapping, Other, Questioning Strategy, Text to Self Connection, Text to Text Connection, Text to World Connection, Timeline
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Activity 3 for Activities
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Quick Stick, Neat trick
Posted: June 8, 2010
Customer avatarBy:Sandy Parker
From:Marion
Estimated Time10-20 minutes
Description:

Post-it® notes are an every day multi-subject teaching tool.
The following are a few ways they may be used in the classroom:
* ABC order (spelling words, vocabulary terms, names etc.)
* Building a time line (labeling by year or sequencing events)
* Quick survey of knowledge (yes/no, right/wrong, fact/opinion, even/odd, true/false, fiction/nonfiction etc.
* Bar graphs on any subject
* Location of place value, worth, rounding of a number
* Estimation (after telling the tale of Peter Rabbit) students must direct Peter to the nearest garden gate less he end up in Mr. McGregor's stew pot. EX--654 rounded to the hundreds place, arrow post-it notes locate the hundreds place, gates are built by two cube post-it notes-600 and 700 on either side of 654-the 5 indicates the nearest gate is 700.
* marginalia-students write on the side of texts without damaging the book-this is an excellent way to mark important facts, mark words that are unclear, to express opinions, and much more
* Location-TEACHER asks students to find a homophone, a contraction, a compound, a antonym, a synonym for a given word etc.
* mnemonics-a word is given -photosynthesis-students copy the word and weave related words into the original (ex. the P of the word becomes producer, the 1st S becomes sugar and the 2nd becomes sap, the L is woven into the word leaf etc.
* sequence of numbers, sentences etc.
* Time call-3rd graders are to tell time to the minute-TEACHER hands out 4 post-it notes and at various intervals calls "TIME"-students record the exact time to the minute-answers checked at the day's end
* Word building-BASE word given and prefixes, suffixes are added
* Labeling of words as they form a sentence-article, noun, verb, adverb, adjective, etc.
* Quick response boards-Construction paper folded hot dog to create a holder-inside post-it notes with terms to review-(ex. EXPLORERS-Columbus, Newport, Cartier, Ponce de Leon-each on a post-it note tucked inside) TEACHER says "He was given credit for discovering the New World." Students pull out Columbus. Used with 5 Civilizations, terms in science, and in math.
* Labeling of items around the room with both English and Spanish terms
How it Works
Step 1TIME-By combining activities, instructors make the most of their classroom instruction.
* ABC order can be combined with the teaching of vocabulary and dictionary skills including guide words
* Quick review post-it notes on Explorers, Civilization, Famous People, monuments etc. can be randomly placed by students on a Bingo board which then becomes a whole subject review.
1st Grade, 2nd Grade, 3rd Grade, 4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade, 7th Grade, 8th Grade, ESL
Classroom Management, History, Language Arts, Math, Reading & Writing, Science, Special Education
Text to Text Connection, Text to World Connection, Timeline
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Activity 4 for Activities
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Nicki Noun and Vicki Verb
Posted: March 31, 2010
Customer avatarBy:Angie Estes
From:Readyville
Estimated Time20-40 minutes
Description:

Title: Nicki Noun and Vicki Verb
State Standard: 0201.1.1: Identify and correctly use nouns and verbs
Goals: TLW be able to identify nouns and verbs.
TLW be able to create complete sentences using given nouns and verbs.
Set: TTW have poster board characters cut out (one boy and one girl) before the lesson begins. TTW introduce Nicki Noun and Vicki Verb to the class. (TT) “These are my friends, Nicki Noun and Vicki Verb. They are going to help use work on naming and using nouns and verbs correctly in sentences. Would you like to see how?”
Teaching: TTW review the definition of nouns and verbs. TTW give each student one blue post-it note and one pink Post-it® note. TLW write a noun on the blue Post-it and a verb on the pink Post-it. TLW bring their Post-its to the teacher to read. If they have a correct noun and verb on their Post-its, they can stick it to Nicki Noun and Vicki Verb. TTW read some of the words aloud and ask the class why this word is a noun or verb. TTW hang Nicki Noun and Vicki Verb on opposite sides of the room. TLW be paired up. One team member has to go to Nicki Noun and the other to Vicki Verb. They pick two Post-it notes and return to their workstation. They do not look at the words until everyone has picked their words.
Guided Practice: Each pair will take the four words they have and create 2 complete sentences using the words. Adding a suffix to the verb to make it agree with the noun is acceptable. For example if the noun is dog and the verb is run the sentence can be “The dog runs quickly.” (TT) “As you write your sentences, try and use adjectives and adverbs to describe the noun and verb you have.”
Independent Practice: TLW be given a list of 10 nouns and 10 verbs. They are to use these to create complete sentences. They will be allowed to match them any way they choose.
Assessment: TLW be assessed on their independent practice paper.
How it Works
Step 1TTW have poster board characters cut out (one boy and one girl) before the lesson begins. TTW introduce Nicki Noun and Vicki Verb to the class. (TT) “These are my friends, Nicki Noun and Vicki Verb. They are going to help use work on naming and using nouns and verbs correctly in sentences. Would you like to see how?”
Step 2Teaching: TTW review the definition of nouns and verbs. TTW give each student one blue Post-it note and one pink Post-it note. TLW write a noun on the blue Post-it and a verb on the pink Post-it. TLW bring their Post-its to the teacher to read. If they have a correct noun and verb on their Post-its, they can stick it to Nicki Noun and Vicki Verb. TTW read some of the words aloud and ask the class why this word is a noun or verb. TTW hang Nicki Noun and Vicki Verb on opposite sides of the room. TLW be paired up. One team member has to go to Nicki Noun and the other to Vicki Verb. They pick two Post-it notes and return to their workstation. They do not look at the words until everyone has picked their words.
Step 3Each pair will take the four words they have and create 2 complete sentences using the words. Adding a suffix to the verb to make it agree with the noun is acceptable. For example if the noun is dog and the verb is run the sentence can be “The dog runs quickly.” (TT) “As you write your sentences, try and use adjectives and adverbs to describe the noun and verb you have.”
2nd Grade
Language Arts
Cluster Mapping
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By Dorothy
 
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Posted March 31, 2010

I am going to use this. It sounds great.
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Activity 5 for Activities
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Post-it® Note Story Map
Posted: July 1, 2010
Customer avatarBy:Elizabeth Spisich
From:Culpeper
Estimated Time20-40 minutes
Description:

With reading comprehension being SO important in first grade, I created this activity to give my students a fun way to be involved in understanding story elements.
First, each child gets a clipboard, pencil, and 4 Post-it® Nnotes. They put the Post-it® Notes in a block shape on the clipboard and label one with each of the following: characters, setting, problem, solution.
Then, read aloud a story, stopping as your read to discuss with your students if they need to add any story information to their story maps. This allows them to get involved in the discussion, so that they can share which new characters you met in the story, what settings they are at, etc.
I always model this activity many times with my students, and when I feel they are ready, I have them complete their own Post-it® Note story map independently. Then, they can get with a partner and compare ideas!
Post-it Story Maps are also awesome for doing story comparisons. One of my favorite activities to do with Post-it story maps is to work with students to make one set of stickies for "Moving Day" by Robert Kalan, then to make another set of stickies for "Is This a House For Hermit Crab?" By Megan McDonald.
After completing both, I give each child a large piece of paper (12 in. x 18 in.) to transfer our Post-its onto. We fold the large piece of paper into four equal sections. Then we take the character sticky for "Moving Day" and the setting sticky for "Is This a House for Hermit Crab?" and put them together in the same box, put the two setting stickies together, put the two problem stickies together, and the two solution stickies together.
Then, students can easily do a compare/contrast between the two stories, and we can take the information and put it into a Venn Diagram!
By using Post-its in this activity, you are providing students with a fun and interactive way to work on reading comprehension!
How it Works
Step 1*See activity information for directions!
1st Grade
Reading & Writing
Story Map, Venn Diagram
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Activity 6 for Activities
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Post-it® Note Flip Books
Posted: October 7, 2009
Customer avatarBy:Janet Neufeld
From:Oak Grove
Estimated Time40-60 minutes
Description:

1. Discuss action story themes with students.
2. Students brainstorm ideas. Examples: Ski Jumps, Skateboarding tricks, Hitting a home run, Sky diving, Making a touchdown, Fishing, The slam dunk, Rock Climbing, Going on a walk, etc.
3. If possible, the students view finished samples of flip books that the teacher or other students have made, bought or checked out from the library.
4. Students make a plan what is going to happen in their story. Ex. Quarterback signals play in huddle. Team goes to the line. Play is put into action. Play by play of ball is drawn as it raises and lowers in the air. Reciever catches the ball. Touchdown. Players cheer.
5.Students develop/draw a rough draft of a character and setting for their story/event. Drawings should be simple, outlines or solid filled shapes work best. Drawings must be dark to show up. Sketch lightly with pencil first and then darken up final copy or trace with pen so that the story may be easily seen as the pages are quickly flipped.
6. Students redraw the character and setting over and over again on medium or large Post-it note pad with slight changes to the character and setting as you flip each page. Students have the flexibility to gradually enlarge objects to zoom in and change the focus or make them smaller to recede into the picture (for example, showing a character wave goodbye and walk off into the sunset.
7. Students and teacher critique work in progress and test the flip book by quickly thumbing through to see how successfully the character is advancing in the story.
8. When complete, the flip book should appear to be a mini silent action film that can be "played" forward or in reverse depending on how you hold and flip through the book with your thumb.
9. Students share their flip books with others in the class.
How it Works
Step 1Discuss action story themes with students. Students brainstorm ideas. Examples: Ski Jumps, Skateboarding tricks, Hitting a home run, Sky diving, Making a touchdown, Fishing, The slam dunk, Rock Climbing, Going on a walk, etc. If possible, the students view finished samples of flip books that the teacher or other students have made, bought or checked out from the library.
Step 2Students make a plan what is going to happen in their story. Ex. Quarterback signals play in huddle. Team goes to the line. Play is put into action. Play by play of ball is drawn as it raises and lowers in the air. Reciever catches the ball. Touchdown. Players cheer.
Step 3Students develop/draw a rough draft of a character and setting for their story/event. Drawings should be simple, outlines or solid filled shapes work best. Drawings must be dark to show up. Sketch lightly with pencil first and then darken up final copy or trace with pen so that the story may be easily seen as the pages are quickly flipped.
Step 4Students redraw the character and setting over and over again on medium or large Post-it Note pad with slight changes to the character and setting as you flip each page. Students have the flexibility to gradually enlarge objects to zoom in and change the focus or make them smaller to recede into the picture (for example, showing a character wave goodbye and walk off into the sunset.
Step 5Students and teacher critique work in progress and test the flip book by quickly thumbing through to see how successfully the character is advancing in the story.
Step 6When complete, the flip book should appear to be a mini silent action film that can be "played" forward or in reverse depending on how you hold and flip through the book with your thumb. Students share their flip books with others in the class.
Educational GoalStudents will learn how to develop story ideas, develop characters and draw actions that communicate an event without the use of words.
Supporting All LearnersActivity steps address several learning types... those who learn by hearing, seeing and making their own flip book.
Lesson ExtensionsStudents may partner up with classmates to make other flip books. Flip books can be geared toward a variety of subjects to reinforce other lessons and as a way for students present what they have learned.
AssignmentStudents may share and display their flip books with family and other students in the school. On family activity nights, students can make a flip book with their parents and siblings.
3rd Grade, 4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade, 7th Grade, 8th Grade
Art
Story Map
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By Scott
 
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Posted November 8, 2009

These are just like the flip books at http://www.flippies.com
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Activity 7 for Activities
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Venn Diagrams
Posted: November 9, 2009
Customer avatarBy:Deborah Taylor
From:Royal Oak
Estimated Time10-20 minutes
Description:

This activity can be done for any grade level and visually makes a huge impact with students.
On my white board I will draw a large Venn diagram. When we are discussing similarities and differences of any topic in science, this is a powerful way to see and assess similarities/differences.
I use this also as a double check of understanding. I may ask similarities and differences between “Atoms and Molecules” for my 6th grade students. I will ask students to use one to three words to describe the similarities and differences of the topic. Since I use the small cube notes, I use three different colors and ask the students to initial their Post-it® Note with their information and their class hour. Students can brainstorm and write their similarities and differences of the topic at hand “Atoms & Molecules” and then we share as a whole group. What is powerful for me as an educator is the clean up! Because the description from the students should be short, I can catch misconceptions of students and classes quickly. I sort the misconceptions by class and color (Atoms, Molecules and similarities all have their own color) and use those as a specific teaching tool for a student or a class. It will also allow me to target those students whose misconceptions could lead them to further confusion later in science. Imagine 150 of each color Post-it Note and how quick it can be to go through the information! It literally takes minutes instead of hours to grade! The kids love the Post-it Notes and the color is POWERFUL!
I have used this activity for many different topics in science and my colleagues in different disciplines have found this a helpful and quick assessment piece!
How it Works
Step 1Draw a Venn Diagram on White board/chalk board/or use on wall of classroom (Bulletin board).
Step 2Find 3 different color 1 1/2 x 2 color post it notes. Enough for each child to have one of each color.
Step 3Using your topic on similarities and differences, (my example is Atoms & Molecules -6th grade) explain briefly what makes atoms similar to molecules and what makes atoms and molecules unique of one another
Step 4In small groups, have students share their ideas on their Post-it Notes. When they are sharing, I ask kids to put their initials and class number on their paper (on the back usually works).
Step 5In small groups, students will take their 3 different color Post-it Notes and put them in the appropriate spot on the Venn Diagram. This will allow those students who are timid to ask questions a visual cue on where to put their notes.
Step 6After we discuss the venn diagram, leave the diagram up for a day or two. At the end of the day check the diagram for misconceptions (for science) or misinformation. It is easy to follow up with a few students rather than many that you could have (I teach middle school).
Educational GoalTo find misconceptions of a particular topic by discussing similarities and differences.
Supporting All LearnersThis supports all learners! The students who need movement are allowed to walk up to the board and place their Post-it Notes up, verbal learners can share their ideas, auditory learners can listen to the activity, visual learners can come up to the board
Lesson ExtensionsI use this Venn Diagram throughout my unit and as students realize a misconception they may have put on the diagram (I have discussed with them by this time) I allow them to put a new post-it up to show their new learning.
AssignmentThis could be followed up with paragraph writing on Atoms and Molecules and using ideas from the board to extend their thinking. It is a powerful tool for middle school kids!
1st Grade, 2nd Grade, 3rd Grade, 4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade, 7th Grade, 8th Grade, ESL
Art, Classroom Management, History, Language Arts, Math, Music, Reading & Writing, Science, Special Education
Venn Diagram
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Activity 8 for Activities
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Math Modalities
Posted: July 6, 2010
Customer avatarBy:Michelle Garrison
From:Melrose
Estimated Time10-20 minutes
Description:

Learning modalities are the sensory channels or pathways through which individuals give, receive, and store information. Perception, memory, and sensation comprise the concept of modality. The modalities or senses include visual, auditory, tactile/kinesthetic, smell, and taste. Researchers, including Reiff, Eisler, Barbe, and Stronck have concluded that in a classroom, the students would be approximately:
25-30% visual
25-30% auditory
15% tactile/kinesthetic
25-30% mixed modalities
Therefore, only 30% of the students will remember most of what is said in a classroom lecture and another 30% will remember primarily what is seen.
At the beginning of the school year or at the start of each new unit, design a poster for each concept or essential question to be learned. Have students write their name on a different colored Post-it® symbolizing whether they are a visual learner (yellow Post-it), auditory learner (blue Post-it), kinesthetic/tactile learner (hot pink Post-it), or mixed (green Post-it). Keep the Post-its in place on the concept's poster and have students generate learning strategies for their way of learning.
For example, during a math lesson regarding fractions; a kinesthetic student might explain how they will learn better if they can physically cut apart objects such as an apple or pizza to represent parts of a whole (fractions).
The purpose of this activity is two-fold: 1) to have the students recognize which learning style they have and 2) to take ownership or responsibility in their learning style by creating activities they know will help them mater or comprehend information more successfully.
How it Works
Step 1Take a Post-it® pad of paper and label the essential question or lesson topics for each section throughout a unit you are about to cover.
Step 2Explain to the students that each colored post-it represents a different learning style: visual, auditory, or kinesthetic/tactile. Have them choose which type of learning suits them best for each topic they will learn in this unit.
Step 3Have students go around the room and label each topic with a Post-it® with their name on it.
Step 4At the end of the unit, or each lesson, have the students refer to which learning style they could learn best by and make an activity suitable to their learning needs. This could be a team project, a report, or any number of different activities. Students will use these activities as an alternate assessment to show mastery of the essential lesson/skill.
5th Grade, 6th Grade, 7th Grade, 8th Grade
History, Language Arts, Math, Reading & Writing, Science
Other
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Activity 9 for Activities
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Post-it® Spelling
Posted: November 9, 2009
Customer avatarBy:Steven Cronson
From:Chanhassen
Estimated Time10-20 minutes
Description:

Children make several letters of the alphabet each making one or more letters so that they have many copies of the letters to work with. Each student or the teacher picks out a "big" word to spell that is more challenging then they currently read. The Teacher or the Student announce the word. The Student may ask the Teacher with help how to pronounce it if needed correctly. Then the Teacher says to the class Ok the word is: " " but does not write it. Then says who has the first letter? What letter do you have? OK Correct! Come to the board and put your letter at the beginning of the word. Next Letter? If a child says the letter next but is not the correct letter, the Teacher thanks the child but says that's not it try again or let another student try. The child does not know so another child says the letter and it is correct. The child brings there letter to the board next to the first one. At some point the word is spelled. The Teacher could set it up as a race to see if the class could spell 1,2,3,4,5 words on the board correctly towards a class treat. And the children should try to learn to spell the new word unassisted.
The goal would be each student would get their word spelled on the board over 2-3 weeks. The children would keep a log of the new words. They would be expected to learn how to pronounce it and know what the word means. (if can) Then the teacher gives the a "test" to match a word with its definition. Also using the post-it notes they could take the word on the board and try to make other words from the letters or word on the board.
How it Works
Step 1Write down your letter(s) of the alphabet onto your Post-it Note(s) making at least 5 copies of your letter.
Step 2Teacher chooses a student who tells the word they chose. (may ask teacher for help pronouncing it)
Step 3The children build the word letter by letter till they get it right.
Step 4When the word is posted on the board, the children write it down in their words notebook. They may try to make other words out the work or letters on the board, As many as can could be goal.
Step 5Next a new child's word is chosen and the same thing occurs.
Step 6The students make up more post-it notes for their letter as they are needed.
Educational GoalTo learn new words and spelling and pronouncing them is the goal. To learn the words definition. Share words the child is interested in with the other children
Supporting All LearnersIt is a non-challenging game since each child chooses the word they want the class as a whole to spell. The teacher should add in words to make sure each child gets to use their letters since some are more common them others. The children could also kee
3rd Grade, 4th Grade, 5th Grade
Reading & Writing
Word Cart Organizer
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Activity 10 for Activities
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Read It/Post It
Posted: April 14, 2010
Customer avatarBy:Joan Easterling
From:Mt. Olive
Estimated Time10-20 minutes
Description:

I am an exceptional needs educator. The majority of my students lack basic reading skills and the DESIRE to read. When teaching sight words I have found that associating words with pictures increase their motivation and ability to retain the information.
My activity:
Early in the year, I tag and label everything in the classroom with its name/title using Post-it® notes. My students pay attention to the words and begin learning them unintentionally. After the labels are displayed for a week or so, we go around the room and identify the objects and the words. Following a week or so of identification, I remove the labels/post-its and we play a matching game. Each student gets a stack of post-its and is asked to label the objects with the coordinating word. This is done initially untimed. Once everyone gets the hang of it we do it again timed.
Another activity I use in conjunction with this one is taking photos of my student's body parts (elbow, foot, etc.) and their actions. I label the part or the action with a post-it. We review the terms with the post-it on the photo. After they become familar with the words, I remove the post-it and have them match the part or action with the correct word on the post-it. Tehy love seeing temselves in the photos and the inability to reuse, remove, and replace the post-its is very economical.
With sight words, I draw pictures that identify the sight word on post-its. Therefore, the student learns the word through the picture and the picture can be removed later for independant identifiaction of matching.
How it Works
Step 1Label objects in the classroom, take photos of students
Step 2Review words
Step 3Play matching game using post-its
Step 4Play game (timed)
1st Grade, 2nd Grade
Reading & Writing, Special Education
Text to Self Connection, Text to Text Connection, Text to World Connection
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